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Tony Woods

Cleantalk Member
Ok guys, I have this 100% polyester rug. Last night I spotted it with some microspotter and rinsed with a wet cloth.
Today it has came out in pink blotches everywhere. I tried rinsing with cold water. Not much help. So I then tried final rinse at dye fix 1/150 .....pink dye patches have gotten worse. What next
 

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Tony Woods

Cleantalk Member
So, following this I spoke with Ken. Ken asked if I had any stainbreak etc. Because the red marks were a likely result of red marks wicking from within the pile. I checked but could not see anything visual on the latex backing that would cause this.
Anyway, I set about using a few dozen cotton buds with fresh 15 min batches of stainbreak working it through the pink. This can be very decieving because if you wet the blotchy pink areas, it disappears and you think hey great. When it dries, it goes pink again. After stainbreak, it went pink AGAIN after drying. At this point I was out of ideas.
I spoke with a local rug cleaner and he advised me to use a litre of water with a teaspoon of baking soda. Work in with a Terry towel.... and wait........that's where it's at right now...... waiting on the dry out again.
 

Mark Roberts.

Cleantalker Veteran
On a natural fibre you will find plenty of bicarb advise on here (use the search for bicarbonate) it's not uncommon, on synthetic though its rare, first time I've read that on Cleantalk for a poly rug if it is a pH problem. New one on me :smile:

I wonder if its a blend like a cotton poly? Hope it sorts it!
 
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Tony Woods

Cleantalk Member
So upon further investigation, I looked up the barcode on this rug and it is sold by a few different online retailers.
Two different retailers have stated this rug is made from 100% acrylic and not 100% polyester as indicated on the label on this rug.
 

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Tony Woods

Cleantalk Member
On a natural fibre you will find plenty of bicarb advise on here (use the search for bicarbonate) it's not uncommon, on synthetic though its rare, first time I've read that on Cleantalk for a poly rug if it is a pH problem. New one on me :smile:

I wonder if its a blend like a cotton poly? Hope it sorts it!
Does the fact that the label is wrong change anything? Label says polyester......it's actually 100% acrylic as indicated by 2 different online retailers
 

Ken Wainwright

Cleantalker Veteran
It was good to talk to you yesterday Tony.

Lots of things spinning through my head in trying to analyse this issue.

If the fibre is polyester, it will have a very soft, luxurious hand. If it is acrylic, it will be stiffer and have a hand similar to wool when the rug is new and more like polypropylene as it wears and flattens.

If the issue is a pH sensitive dye, the reaction between the first treatment with an alkaline spotter and later with the acidic rinse would produce a different colour to one another. As it is pink each time, it doesn't fit with the expected reaction.

This looks like a gun-tufted rug. It is not unheard of for the pattern to be drawn with a felt tip pen. I know I asked you to open the pile and look down to the backing for ink marks and none were visible. However, my suspicion is that any markings would not be on the side of the primary backing that you can see, but out of sight on the reverse where the technician can work to the pattern lines. If the rug is still only slightly damp at the tuft base or backing level (most likely), then no matter how successful your treatments, more will wick to the surface from the deep down moisture. This is still my primary theory as to the issues.

To help you understand the markings and the gun tufting process, see the video below


Safe and happy cleaning:smile:
Ken
 
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Tony Woods

Cleantalk Member
Morning Ken, it has my head spinning too. I checked 3 different online retailers and yes all saying rug is made from acrylic and not polyester as indicated on the label on this rug.
Each time I wet the fibres, the pink Completely disappears and when it dries out it returns.
At this point it is undoubtedly a replacement. I have kept the rug and will experiment and dissect it just to see what is actually deep within. I even tested the microspotter in a small area for 10 mins with no reaction prior to spotting.
It a learning experience, and has even baffled people much more experienced than myself.
Anyway, thanks for the help.
Here is the rug after I used magic bullet this morning. MB supposedly switches from alkaline to acidic during the dwell.
I understand it won't stop the wicking. But I have not removed anything, no dye transfer. I checked through all my microfiber cloths and not a drop of red. It appears to be very pH sensitive.
Tony
 

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Paul Clapham

Cleantalk Member
Tom, going forward, have a word with your local rug cleaning company and get them to clean ALL of your rugs , it makes life some much easier , and safer!
 

Tony Woods

Cleantalk Member
Tom, going forward, have a word with your local rug cleaning company and get them to clean ALL of your rugs , it makes life some much easier , and safer!
I can understand your viewpoint Paul. I however see this as a minor setback, there is a ton of work in this field in my area and I actually enjoy it. It is certainly more challenging than regular carpet cleaning, it's somewhere between carpet and upholstery cleaning. I see this as an opportunity to learn, move forward and understand a bit better. Sure it's inconvenient, but you will never develop as a cleaner or person if you shriek from every obstacle that's thrown your way.
 
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