Louis De Poortere vintage from Belgium, the construction is wool, cotton

Michael Bushell

Cleantalk Member
I just knew that one day I would be asked to clean an expensive rug, it’s from Louis De Poortere vintage range called Black & White, construction is wool & cotton chenille.
I’m thinking of using Fusion Clean lightly agitated with a mitt and very slow rotary and wetted pad to lift out dirt and then lightly towel dry, anyone else got any thoughts how to tackle this please.
 

Ken Wainwright

Cleantalker Veteran
As the rug is a flat weave, I would follow JB's advice above. But be aware that flat weaves can "wrinkle" a bit so it may need blocking.

Safe and happy cleaning:smile:
Ken
 
  • Useful
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

Ken Wainwright

Cleantalker Veteran
Think of these flat weave rugs as being more like a heavy weight piece of fabric rather than constructed like a carpet. It wouldn't surprise me if this rug has a 100% cotton foundation yarn. It will be more like a heavy fabric on the floor than a stiff, dimensionaly stable carpet. I wouldn't recommend a rotary or even a CRB. It could prove difficult with a risk of damaging the rug. I would use a pile brush gently or even a soft tampico upholstery brush.

To prevent the wrinkle/rucking, it would be necessary to nail the rug to the floor (blocking) and then any shrinkage forces would be contained. The rug dries and it should be fine. Clean the rug without blocking and if it's a cotton foundation, it will ruck but probably return to normal after a few days use, but there's no guarantee. If the foundation yarns are wool, I would be surprised if it rucked, but still no guarantee

Safe and happy cleaning:smile:
Ken
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

Michael Bushell

Cleantalk Member
Think of these flat weave rugs as being more like a heavy weight piece of fabric rather than constructed like a carpet. It wouldn't surprise me if this rug has a 100% cotton foundation yarn. It will be more like a heavy fabric on the floor than a stiff, dimensionaly stable carpet. I wouldn't recommend a rotary or even a CRB. It could prove difficult with a risk of damaging the rug. I would use a pile brush gently or even a soft tampico upholstery brush.

To prevent the wrinkle/rucking, it would be necessary to nail the rug to the floor (blocking) and then any shrinkage forces would be contained. The rug dries and it should be fine. Clean the rug without blocking and if it's a cotton foundation, it will ruck but probably return to normal after a few days use, but there's no guarantee. If the foundation yarns are wool, I would be surprised if it rucked, but still no guarantee

Safe and happy cleaning:smile:
Ken
The rug is on a very expensive parquet wooden flooring, the owner of the property is a property developer, so I need to be very careful.
 

John Bolton

Cleantalker Veteran
I was typing a reply along the lines of Kens post but was interrupted by a phone call.

I would add that serious rucking is a result of uneven moisture so at every stage try to avoid this. If you force-dry too strongly this too can accentuate rucking.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

Jacob Ward

Cleantalk Member
Michael
It might be best to,

remove it to an environment you can control and do all the cleaning there.

And as Ken has said to mitigate shrinkage or rucking.

This should be reflected in your quotation/charges.

J
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Ken Wainwright

Cleantalker Veteran
For all rug blocking, you do not tack to the customers floor but take it off site to be cleaned.

If you do not have the facilities or the skill set, this is best left to someone already established in this field of work.

Safe and happy cleaning:smile:
Ken
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Top